Emergency Dental Care

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Dental Emergency?
We have you covered.

VC Dental offers same day emergency dental care, 7 days a week, with no weekend surcharge. We treat many emergency cases including toothaches, sporting injuries and broken teeth.

If you are wondering what to do in a dental emergency, please look at the table below. We have outlined the best and worst things to do for the most common emergencies we see. We hope this will provide you with some assistance until you can get to a dentist or hospital.

  • Toothache

    What to do?

    1. Gently rinse the mouth with lukewarm water (otherwise cold) to remove any debris and clean out any obvious cavities, if any.
    2. Gently use dental floss to further remove any food that might be trapped within the cavity or between the teeth.
    3. If swelling is present, place a cold compress on the outside of the cheek.
    4. Give oral pain relief if necessary (as directed on the packet), using medication that you know is safe for the patient to take.
    5. See a dentist as soon as possible.

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    What not to do?

    1. Do not use heat
    2. Do not place pain relief tablets directly onto the tooth (especially aspirin) they will not work and can cause soft tissue burn.
  • Chipped, fractured or cracked tooth

    What to do?

    1. Clean debris from the injured area with lukewarm water (otherwise use cold).
    2. Try and find all of the bits of teeth that are missing. Rinse them in milk, or if no milk is available either the patient’s saliva or water. Keep the pieces moist at all times. Store them in a clean glass or container with milk or the patient’s saliva. Otherwise wet a cloth or some gauze with water and wrap them up in that.
    3. If caused by a blow or swelling is otherwise present, place a cold compress on the outside of the cheek next to the injured tooth.
    4. If it there is constant bleeding, use a clean cotton handkerchief, cloth, tea towel or gauze to apply firm constant pressure to the bleeding site. Never use tissue.
    5. See a dentist straight away and bring the pieces of teeth with you.

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    What not to do?

    1. Do not use tissues.
    2. Do not use heat.
  • Dislodged tooth

    What to do?

    1. Call a dentist straight away, and try to see them within one hour of the incident.
    2. If there is constant bleeding, use a clean cotton handkerchief, cloth, tea towel or gauze to apply firm constant pressure to the bleeding site. Never use tissue.
    3. Give oral pain relief if necessary (as directed on the packet), using medication that you know is safe for the patient to take.
    4. If caused by a blow or swelling is otherwise present, place a cold compress on the outside of the cheek next to the injured tooth.
    5. See a dentist as soon as possible.

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    What not to do?

    1. Don’t play with the tooth; this means wiggling it with fingers, trying to rotate it, pushing it with the tongue or trying to pull it out.
    2. Never use tissue.
    3. Do not place pain relief tablets directly onto the tooth (especially aspirin) they will not work and can cause soft tissue burn.
    4. Do not use heat.
  • Knocked-out permanent (adult) tooth

    What to do?

    1. Call a dentist straight away, and try to see them within 30 minutes to one hour of the incident.
    2. Find the tooth. Only hold the tooth by the crown (top part), never by the roots.
    3. If the tooth is dirty rinse it with milk, or if no milk is available use the patient’s saliva.
    4. Keep the tooth moist. Place it in a clean glass or container completely submerged in milk. If milk is unavailable use a sample of the patient’s saliva. If there is no clean container available sit the tooth inside the cheek of the patient. If the patient is unconscious or unable to do so, you can wrap the tooth in plastic wrap.
    5. If caused by a blow or swelling is otherwise present, place a cold compress on the outside of the cheek next to the injured tooth.
    6. Give oral pain relief if necessary (as directed on the packet), using medication that you know is safe for the patient to take.
    7. If it there is constant bleeding, use a clean cotton handkerchief, cloth, tea towel or gauze to apply firm constant pressure to the bleeding site. Never use tissue.
    8. See a dentist as soon as possible and take the tooth to the dentist with you.

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    What not to do?

    1. Don’t scrub or rub the tooth. Don’t remove any soft tissue fragments still attached, these need to be preserved.
    2. Do not store the tooth in water.
    3. Do not use heat.
    4. Do not place pain relief tablets directly onto the tooth socket (especially aspirin) they will not work and can cause soft tissue burn.
    5. Never use tissue.
  • Knocked-out primary (baby) tooth

    What to do?

    1. Even though baby teeth aren’t permanent, they still require attention. Trauma to baby teeth can harm the permanent teeth developing underneath the gum. Call a dentist straight away, and try to see them within 30 minutes to one hour of the incident.
    2. Find the tooth. Only hold the tooth by the crown (top part), never by the roots.
    3. If caused by a blow or swelling is otherwise present, place a cold compress on the outside of the cheek next to the injured tooth.
    4. Give oral pain relief if necessary (as directed on the packet), using medication that you know is safe for the patient to take.
    5. If it there is constant bleeding, use a clean cotton handkerchief, cloth, tea towel or gauze to apply firm constant pressure to the bleeding site. Never use tissue.
    6. If the tooth is dirty rinse it with milk, or if no milk is available use the patient’s saliva.
    7. Keep the tooth moist. Place it in a clean glass or container completely submerged in milk. If milk is unavailable use a sample of the patient’s saliva. If there is no clean container available sit the tooth inside the cheek of the patient. If the patient is unconscious or unable to do so, you can wrap the tooth in plastic wrap.
    8. See a dentist as soon as possible.

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    What not to do?

    1. Do not attempt to put the tooth back in the socket as this can damage the developing permanent tooth.
    2. Do not use heat.
    3. Do not place pain relief tablets directly onto the tooth socket (especially aspirin) they will not work and can cause soft tissue burn.
    4. Never use tissue.
    5. Don’t scrub or rub the tooth. Don’t remove any soft tissue fragments still attached, these need to be preserved.
    6. Do not store the tooth in water.
  • Trauma, cuts and bleeding to mouth tissue: lip, cheeks and gums

    What to do?

    1. Use a clean cotton handkerchief, cloth, tea towel or gauze to apply firm constant pressure to the bleeding site. Never use tissue.
    2. Sit down and maintain the pressure for at least ten minutes.
    3. If the trauma is serious or bleeding cannot be controlled, seek immediate medical attention.
    4. If swelling is present, place a cold compress on the outside of the cheek next to the injury.
    5. See a dentist as soon as possible.

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    What not to do?

    1. Never use tissue.
    2. Don’t lie down flat.
    3. Do not use heat.
  • Broken braces

    What to do?

    1. If a wire snaps or protrudes out and rubs against the cheek or gum, you can try gently pushing it into a more comfortable spot using the eraser end of a pencil.
    2. Otherwise you can cover the end of the wire with a small cotton ball, piece of gauze or soft wax.
    3. See a dentist as soon as possible.

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    What not to do?

    1. Do not cut any protruding pieces of wire; the patient could easily swallow it or inhale it into the lungs.
    2. If wire is embedded in the cheek, tongue or gum tissue, don’t attempt to remove it yourself.


This page is intended to give general information on dental trauma to help you be prepared, or to help you until you can get to a dentist. It is not intended to be a replacement for professional medical advice. In any event of serious dental trauma call a dentist or medical professional straight away, and get to the dentist or hospital as soon as you can.

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  • 36 - 40 Victoria Street
  • East Gosford NSW 2250
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